Participate In Our Research

Does Motor Synchornization to Rhythmic Auditory Stimulation (RAS) Alter Dopamine Responses in Parkinson’s Disease?

What is this study about?
Have you walked along auditory rhythm or music? Rhythmic auditory cueing is known to facilitate movement and activates the dopamine (DA) related areas of brain. However, the effects of rhythm on DA responses are unknown. We are aiming at answering the question of whether rhythm and music modulates DA function in Parkinson’s disease and seeking people with Parkinson’s disease living in Ontario to participate in our brain imaging study in Music.

Eligibility Criteria:
– Diagnosis of Parkinson’s Disease
– Aged 50+
– Right-handed
– Not be pregnant and/or breastfeeding
– Have no metal implants or a cardiac pacemaker
– Non-smoker

Interested in participating?
Contact Yuko Koshimori at ras.study@camh.ca

See the flyer here for more details.

Paired Neurologic Music Therapy and Transcranial Direct Current Stimulation for Upper Extremity Stroke Recovery

What is this study about?
This stroke motor recovery study involves the pairing of Neurologic Music Therapy and non-invasive brain stimulation. Spanning 6 weeks, this study uses music-based exercise for upper extremities, simultaneously paired with transcranial direct current stimulation.

Eligibility Criteria:
– Adults (18-80 years of age)
– Stroke, 3 months or more since first stroke
– Motor limitations
– Ability to follow instructions

Exclusion Criteria:
– Severe cognitive deficits
– Severe apraxia
– Severe neglect
– Neurodegenerative or psychiatric disease
– Contraindications for tDCS (metal implants, pacemaker, history of seizures)

Interested in participating?
Contact Chantelle at chantelle.whiteside@mail.utoronto.ca

See the flyer here for more details.

The Effects of a Listening Program of Autobiographically Salient Music Listening on Cognitive Measures and Underlying Neural Mechanisms in Mild Cognitive Impairment

What is this study about?
This study uses electroencephalography (EEG), a non-invasive and safe neuroimaging method to investigate the impact of a 2-week, at-home, music listening program of personally meaningful music (20 mins/day) on changes in brain activity and memory, in people with mild cognitive impairment. This music should be meaningful to you and associated to your personal memories, such that when you listen to them, they make you think of a particular person, place, experience, or time period (i.e., the song you danced to at your wedding).

Eligibility Criteria:
– Aged 60+
– Received a diagnosis of mild cognitive impairment
– English speaking
– Obtained a minimum of high school education
– Adequate hearing and vision
– Can identify 15 English vocal/lyrical songs that are associated to your personal memories
– Can commit to listening to your personal playlist (20 mins) at-home for 2 weeks (minimum 5 days/week) and visiting Baycrest twice

Interested in Participating?
Contact Veronica Vuong at veronica.vuong@utoronto.ca

Can Music Training Enhance/Affect Working Memory and Speech-in-Noise Perception in Cochlear Implant Users? A Randomized Controlled Study of EEG Measures of Improvement

What is this study about?
CI users can follow conversations in quiet environments, but most of them face great limitations in understanding speech in noisy conditions. Music training was shown to augment the shared auditory and cognitive neural networks for processing speech and music. Furthermore, active music playing improves auditory-motor coupling which benefits speech perception in noisy listening conditions in both healthy and hearing-impaired persons. 

This study involves 4 weeks of individual music training sessions and 3 EEG recordings for CI users to research the effect of music training on speech understanding in noise for CI users. 

Eligibility criteria: 

– Adults (18-80 years of age) 
– 12 months of CI experience 
– Having native or bilingual fluency in English 

Exclusion criteria: 
– Single sided deafness (SSD) 
– Severe cognitive deficits 
– Neurodegenerative or psychiatric disease 

Interested in Participating?
Contact Kathrin Mertel at kathrin.mertel@mail.utoronto.ca

See the flyer here for more details.